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CCXV

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

FAITH

It all depends upon your point of view:

Up there above the clouds, the Sun is bright;

Down here it seems the best that he can do

Is heighten contrast, marking with his light

The darker gray that makes the light gray white.

They say the eye of Faith can see the blue

Still there behind the sprawling gray, in spite

Of surfaces that yield up not a clue:

Seeing the Truth depends upon your point of view.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

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CLXXXXI 

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 One of my life goals is to write a history of philosophy entirely in limericks.  Why?  Because I can.

Rene DesCartes

INDUBITABLY

Limericks # 15-18

There once was a man named DesCartes

Who asked, “Where should Philosophy start?”

He said, “If I can doubt it,

I’ll just do without it.

Now, that ought to make me look smart!”

 

So he doubted the clear and the plain

To see what would finally remain.

‘Twas thus he found out

There was no way to doubt

The doubt in the doubter’s own brain.

 

“I exist!” then with joy he concluded.

“On this point I cannot be deluded:

Even though it sounds dumb,

If I think–ergo sum!”

To this day he has not been refuted.

 

If you ask what this tale is about,

It’s that doubting must always run out.

For you never can doubt

That you’re doubting the doubt

That you doubt when you’re doubting your doubt.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

CLXXXI

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 

Habakkuk is supremely the prophet who wrestles with the mystery of how God works even through evil to accomplish His purposes of good for His people (cf. Rom. 8:18-30, esp. 8:28).  This means that we often cannot see the good in the short run.  Yet still we must trust in God’s wisdom and sovereignty.  “Though the fig tree should not blossom and there be no fruit on the vines, thought the yield of the olive should fail and the field produce no food, though the flock should be cut off from the fold and there be no cattle in the stalls, yet I will exult in the Lord, I will rejoice in the God of my salvation.”  We each have to find our own way to that place.

CSLComfortableLife

SONG

Paraphrase: Habakkuk 3:17-19

 

Though all my friends should fade like the stars from the sky

Before the dawn,

Like the leaves in June that greet the breeze with a sigh

But soon are gone

When the Autumn winds blow sharp and cold, and nigh

The hearth you’re drawn

And the winter snows, so deathly still, seem to lie

A lifetime long.

Though this and worse should be my lot of woe

Or grief or care,

Though all of joy should be forgot and go

I know not where,

Though all the streams of time should seem to flow

Toward despair,

Still this would be my strength and song, to know

That You are there—

Unchanged since You laid down your life just so

I could be spared;

Yes this would be my strength and song, just to know

That You are there.

ResurrectionJesus-998x665

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Book-CSLTheology-Cover

 

Donald T. Williams, PhD

CLXXXII

 

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 

The sufferings of Christ on the Cross at that singular moment of space-time history were sufficient to pay for all our sins forever.  But they strangely do not end, not yet.  For He suffers continually along with His persecuted people, asking Saul why he was persecuting Him—and He feels acutely also the wounds they inflict upon themselves.  What the ultimate purpose of these additional sufferings is we do not know.  But they certainly serve to highlight the depths of Christ’s identification with His people.

 

COMMENTARY, HEB. 6:6

 

Behold it, battered beyond recognition:

It gazes, hardly human, through the thorns.

Weeping tears of shame, yet still it scorns

To call down angels and abort the mission.

Wonder, then, how long in this condition

It can endure to be so bruised and torn,

To bear fresh wounds on those already born

And still remain strung up on exhibition.

 

The world looks on and thinks it comprehends:

“Another Promise failed, a Name besmirched;

So must all false Messiahs make amends.”

You recognize, impaled upon its perch,

The Body of our Savior?  Oh, my friends—

This is the other Body of Christ:  the Church.

 

 

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

CLXXI

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

There are a lot of reasons why we believe in Christ as the Son of God and Savior of the world.  What are some of them, and how do they work together to lead us to Him?

Portrait-Jesus3

APOLOGIA

Structured steps within the Dance,

Things which could not be by chance:

Architecture of belief?

Arch of bole and vein of leaf.

Crystal’s angles; raindrop’s curves;

Bone and sinew knit with nerves.

Flick of wrist, fly-toss, and then,

Break of bubble, flash of fin.

Beyond these sure and certain hints,

A clearer class of evidence:

Broken fever; opened eyes;

Dove descending from the skies.

Footstep firm on slope of wave;

Stone rolled back from Jesus’ grave.

Glory growing out of grief?

Architecture of belief;

Things which could not be by chance:

Structured steps within the Dance.

"Lord, teach us to pray."

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, due out Dec. 1, 2016, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Book-CSLTheology-Cover

CLXVIII

 Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Two villanelles on the noetic effects of sin, i.e., its effects on the mind?  It is an important and neglected topic.  Last week we looked at it in the abstract; this week’s villanelle takes a more existential approach to the idea.

dante-satan

THE NOETIC EFFECTS OF SIN, II

Though Satan threatens always to deceive

And oft the veil seems heavy on my face,

Lord help mine unbelief, for I believe!

I’ve seen through every subtle wile he weaves

And would with all my heart your truth embrace,

But Satan threatens always to deceive.

The tyranny of sight gives no reprieve,

More garish than the glimmers of your grace;

Lord, help mine unbelief, for I believe.

The evidence is there; I do perceive

It clearly and myself can make the case,

But Satan threatens always to deceive.

The certainty you help me to achieve

Can sometimes disappear without a trace;

Lord, help mine unbelief, for I believe.

It’s all so plain!  How deeply you must grieve

To see me still in doubting Thomas’ place.

Since Satan threatens always to deceive,

Lord, help mine unbelief, for I believe.

 

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Book-CSLTheology-Cover