Monthly Archives: November 2017

CCXVII

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

NATIVITY

It pushes up from down below;

The hillside slopes and drops away:

And so the stream begins to flow—

Exactly where, I cannot say.

 

Where leaves have fallen, there they lie;

The rain soaks through them day by day.

Slowly the top layers dry—

Exactly when, I cannot say.

 

And then the leaves are wet again:

The damp spreads downhill like a ray.

It gathers to a trickle then—

Exactly how, I cannot say.

 

Imperceptibly its force

Collects, ‘til in a bed of clay

(The leaves expelled) it makes its course—

Exactly where, I cannot say.

 

Although the stream is very young,

It has some things it wants to say:

You realize it’s found its tongue—

Exactly when, I cannot say.

 

It disappears beneath a stone;

Then suddenly, several yards away,

It’s back again—and t has grown.

Exactly how, I cannot say.

 

It pushes up from down below;

The hillside slopes and drops away;

And so the stream begins to flow—

Exactly where, I cannot say.

 

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

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THANKSGIVING

With Christmas Carols and Christmas decorations taking over the stores when Halloween is barely past, and Black Friday looming right after it, Thanksgiving is a holiday that has a hard time maintaining its position in American life.  And what that position is can be hard to determine, beyond an excuse to consume obscene amounts of Turkey and doze through a football game under the influence of all the Tryptophan flooding one’s system.  I will probably consume a little more Turkey than is ideal for my diet and  watch some football myself.  But I hope I don’t forget what the Pilgrims were thankful for: not prosperity but survival, and a survival which meant a chance to have a new life in which they could worship God according to Scripture as they understood it, without interference from prying magistrate or prelate.  I hope I don’t forget that they thought such freedom something worth risking their survival over.  And I hope I will not be the only one pondering the question whether they might have been right about that after all.

Thanksgiving is a time to remember our Forefathers and what they struggled for.  It is also a time to ponder the virtues of thankfulness in itself.  I remember once at a picnic a rather gaudy, elaborately articulated, and heraldically colored bug flew by and landed on one of us.  We spent a few minutes oohing and ahing over its surreal beauty, and then my friend David Stott Gordon made a profound observation on the moPilgrims2ment.  “It must be rather depressing to be an atheist,” he mused, “because they don’t have anyone to thank.”

 

We are made to give thanks and praise for the thousand little wonders that the world constantly showers upon us.  Think about that football game: When a receiver makes a particularly acrobatic, even balletic catch as the consummation of the incredible timing between him and the quarterback, combining power and grace in the way that only American football allows for, some response is required of us.  We don’t just raise a Spockian eybrow; we pump our fist and shout if it was for our side, and exclaim that it was a great play even if it wasn’t.  The enjoyment of the moment is not complete without the expression of praise.  And if all such wonders are merely chance occurrences due only to the random motion of atoms and ultimately mean nothing–if indeed there is no One to thank–then our enjoyment of the world must of necessity be truncated and incomplete at best.  The holiday can serve as a reminder of the virtue of receptiveness to the blessings with which life showers us, as blessings–as gifts from the hand of God.  The thing we should be thankful for most of all is the fact that as Christians, as people who know the Creator as the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we have some One to thank.

Pilgrims1

Thanks be to God.

For more of Dr. Williams’ writing, go to the Lantern Hollow estore and order his books, Stars Through the Clouds, Reflections from Plato’s Cave, and Inklings of Reality.

https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/.

CCXV

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

FAITH

It all depends upon your point of view:

Up there above the clouds, the Sun is bright;

Down here it seems the best that he can do

Is heighten contrast, marking with his light

The darker gray that makes the light gray white.

They say the eye of Faith can see the blue

Still there behind the sprawling gray, in spite

Of surfaces that yield up not a clue:

Seeing the Truth depends upon your point of view.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

CCXVI

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

CONSEQUENCES

Silently the secret lovers crept,

Trying to believe they left no trail,

While ever Modred sneered and Arthur slept.

And rumors grew, and Modred was adept

At sounding true while plotting to rebel,

And silently the secret lovers crept.

Each tryst, they swore, the last that would be kept:

And thus they swore and fell and swore and fell,

While ever Modred sneered and Arthur slept.

Though Guinnevere in private sighed and wept

And Lancelot was lord of inner hell,

Still silently the secret lovers crept.

So closer to the precipice they stepped,

And tottered on the edge, but could not tell,

And ever Modred sneered and Arthur slept.

And so, headlong, the awful hours leapt

Toward death, the convent, and the hermit’s cell

As silently the secret lovers crept

And ever Modred sneered and Arthur slept.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

CCXIV

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

FIRMAMENT

Thin clouds set by the moon aglow;

Concentric circles fade away:

White like sun on face of snow

Melts through silver into gray.

The surface is not smooth, but creased:

Rents and patches, not a few,

Hurried on from West to East,

Sometimes let a star shine through.

Frame it all with stands of pine,

Silent shapes against the light.

Shifting shadows redefine

Modulating moods of night.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD