L

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 

It is now the Autumn of 1974 and the beginning of my Middler year in Seminary.  While adding Hebrew to my Greek and gaining additional grounding in biblical studies, theology, and church history, I managed also to find time for some walks in the woods before the onset of another winter and to experiment a bit with enjambment, the art of making your sentences end at different points in your lines of iambic pentameter to avoid predictable monotony and enhance the flow of your sonnet.

 

SONNET XVI

 

It was a deep, dark forest.  No wind stirred

The woven branches there.  No greater sound

In all that heavy stillness could be heard

Than worn-out oak leaves dropping to the ground.

The floor was covered with their rusty brown

As I, not unaffected by the gloom,

Came slowly shuffling through with eyes cast down.

The arching branches, closing in, assumed

The aspect of dim vaults in ancient tombs,

When, sudden, splashed amidst the brown, a small

Bright patch of gold I saw, the earth in bloom,

Where one lone maple’s let her leaf-cloak fall.

Tell me—was it leaves I saw that hour,

Or Zeus descending in a golden shower?

 

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://www.createspace.com/3562314 and order Stars Through the Clouds!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Advertisements

About gandalf30598

Theologian, philosopher, poet, and critic; minister of the Gospel who makes his living by teaching medieval and renaissance literature; dual citizen of Narnia and Middle Earth.

Posted on November 28, 2011, in Donald Williams, Poetry and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: