XL

XL

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

It is not only the Sonnet that has fallen into undeserved disuse in our modern/postmodern obsession with unstructured stream of consciousness; narrative poetry has lost its proper role in a balanced and healthy poetic art too.  So we’d better do something about that—and besides, there is a lot of intense biblical study going on that needs to be find its place in my verse to be fully assimilated.  Here is one result:

 

SOLILOQUY:

THE SAMARITAN WOMAN SPEAKS

 

I didn’t expect that day to find him there,

His tired legs stretched out along the ground—

For I’d come late, just to avoid the stares,

The winks, the giggled whispers, and the frowns

Of all the other women of the town.

 

I didn’t expect t find him there that day,

His weary back propped up against the well

(For the burdens of the whole world seemed to weigh

Upon his mighty shoulders), but we fell

To talking.  Who he was, I could not tell.

 

But he could tell me everything that I

Had ever done.  His words into the core

Of my soul struck, and burned, and made me cry.

And I, who’d known so many men before—

Could I dare think that he was something more?

 

A prophet, surely—you could see he knew

Things that no ordinary man could know.

And when he spoke of God, his words rang true,

As if he knew firsthand that they were so.

“I know Messiah’s coming, and He will show

 

Us all things when He comes,” I said, and he

Gave me a look that made my heart stand still

In wonder, fear, and awed expectancy

To hear what he would say.  His words were chill,

Like a drink from the mountain-high spring that refreshes and fills!

 

And all that he has said was “I am He.”

I ran back to the town to tell the rest,

“Messiah is at the well!  Oh, come and see!”

Some stared at me as if I was possessed

Or the maker (or brunt, perhaps) of some bad jest,

 

But some there were who did come back with me

To my new master, Jesus, there to be

From all their load of sin and self set free.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://www.createspace.com/3562314 and order Stars Through the Clouds!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

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About gandalf30598

Theologian, philosopher, poet, and critic; minister of the Gospel who makes his living by teaching medieval and renaissance literature; dual citizen of Narnia and Middle Earth.

Posted on August 29, 2011, in Donald Williams and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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