Blog Archives

Movie Muses: Thor 2 and Why Characters Matter

Last weekend, I got to see another new movie.  I feel very spoiled.  Normally I wait for them to trickle their way down into the local dollar theater (which actually costs two dollars on weekends… I feel lied to) or just rent them later from Redbox.  But not lately.  Lately, I have been too eager to see these new films in theaters!

thor the dark world filmI went into Thor: The Dark World with mildly optimistic expectations.  By optimistic, I mean that I expected to be entertained, if in a very shallow way, by lots of action and adventure and things being smashed by a hammer and Loki being an extraordinary villain(ish). That’s all I wanted.  I had read a few reviews ahead of time that indicated the movie could be summed up as cheesy good fun and nothing more.

That is pretty much exactly what the second Thor movie is.  It is funny, it is fun to watch, and it is pretty shallow entertainment, but not in a bad way.  When we left the theater, though, I made a profound realization about this movie.  And this is the profound realization that I made:

“The plot kind of sucked.  If it hadn’t been for the characters, this would have been a horrible movie.”

Clearly, I am meant to be a movie critic because I think such deep thoughts.

But I stand by what I said. The plot is pretty silly.  Without giving away anything crucial (although just to be safe, I’ll cry spoilers! so you can’t get mad at me), this is basically how it goes:

Ancient evil elves want to destroy the universe using glowy universe-destroying goo.  Thor stops them.  The end.

 

dark elves thor dark world

Evil elves!

I know.  Wow.

But despite the fact that the plot was not terribly enthralling and a lot of it was simply Thor tossing the hammer and angsting about saving his girl, it was still enjoyable.  Why is that?

The answer is because of the characters.  Or rather, because of some of the characters.  Ironically, the main characters of this film, Thor and Jane, are not the strong ones.  They don’t do any growing or character development during the movie and while they are both generally likable and decent characters, they were not the ones who had the audience laughing and deeply engaged throughout.  Instead, the characters who held this movie together were several of the secondary characters.

One of the greatest fears we have when we go to see a sequel is that the idiot producers will look at what people liked in the first film and then overdo it in the second one (think: Pirates of the Caribbean franchise).  In a way, this movie did take what was good in the first film and give us more, but in this case it actually worked.

thor dark world darcy erik internThe characters that I enjoyed in the first film, such as Jane’s friends Erik and Darcy, were even funnier and more charming in this film.  They had a very strong supporting role and I cared more about them than I did about Jane.  Again, I had no hard feelings toward the female lead, but she wasn’t what drew my attention.

Now, there was one other character who was extremely important, crucial even, for the success of this film.  I’m not forgetting him.  I’m just saving him for last.

loki thor dark world lokiMany people liked the first movie more for the villain than for the hero, and in this movie, the character Loki is improved upon, if that is even possible.  He is even more sardonic and snarky and wounded and clever and interesting.  If anyone grows in this film as a character, it is actually Loki, although I will not tell you that he becomes “good.”  Watch it and see for yourself what happens with him.  No spoilers from me.  Suffice to say that Loki alone makes this movie worth watching.

Ultimately, this movie is about the characters more than it is about the story because, let’s face it, the story is pretty silly.  Furthermore, this movie is about the secondary characters rather than about the title character or his lady love because, let’s face it, they’re nice and all but not that fantastic.

thor dark world lokiFor someone who cares more about characters than plot, this film demonstrated something that I find is often very true for me as both a reader and a writer: characters are crucial.  Do not create stock characters, stereotypes, and meaningless minions.  Characters aren’t just there to walk through the story.  We are people and so we want to engage with real people when we read (or watch) a story.  Yes, the plot does matter.  The plot matters a lot.  But the characters are the ones to whom the plot happens, who make the decisions, who experience the adventures and intrigues, the ones we root for or can’t wait to see fail. We have to be able to like them or dislike them.  We have to be able to remember them.

If we don’t care about the characters, we won’t care about the plot.  The story will lose its impact, no matter how clever (or not!) it actually is.

So make the characters count.

The Best of Tobias Mastgrave: On Villains Part 3

As you know, Tobias Mastgrave has started his own blog after a good run with us here at LHP.  In thanks to him and recognition of his work, for the next few week’s we’re running several of his highest rated posts from days past.  Check out his blog athttp://tobiasmastgrave.wordpress.com

Good luck and Godspeed Tobias in your new endeavors!

Lantern Hollow Press

http://lanternhollow.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/newrule5.gif?w=239&h=27&h=27

I want to speak today on one of the most important factors of creating a believable, frightening, impactful villain: motivations.

Ok…I’m going to rant here for just a moment, it won’t be long I promise, if you’d rather get on with things just skip down to the next paragraph.  Many villains that we see in media today have no real motivations.  The deciding factor behind the majority of their actions seems to be ‘how do I PROVE that I’m evil’.  In the entirety of human history, I promise you, no more than a handful of people have gone out of their way to PROVE that they were evil…and the ones that did, NOT THE BEST VILLAINS IN HISTORY! Hitler, Mussolini, and Hirohito did not think of themselves as villains.  Nero and Caligula did not think of themselves as villains.  Real villains DON’T HAVE TO PROVE THEY ARE EVIL!!!

Anyway, short rant done now on to motivations.  Your villains should have reasons for pretty much everything they do, good reasons, believable reasons.  However the key to any character, villains included, is to define their central motivations.  What factor, or combination of factors, drives your villain to his wickedness? Does he lust after power? Does he want to become a god? Does he want to protect his people or his family? Is he running away from something in his past? Is it as simple as he just doesn’t know how to do anything else?

Let’s look at the motivations of some excellent villains. In my last post I used Star Wars as an example, I love Star Wars…to be honest I’m a little bit obsessed. Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader are two of my favorite villains, they have excellent and CLEAR motivations.  Darth Vader falls into the dark side trying to save his wife, to protect his family.  However once corrupted, once he has lost everything he loved, he continues to pursue power despite clearly seeing it’s evil.  In a poignant moment in ‘Return of the Jedi’ he responds to Luke’s pleas with the statement ‘It is too late for me son, you do not know the power of the dark side. I must obey my master.”

Darth Vader understands his own darkness, his own evil, but he sees no way out. The Emperor, on the other hand, does not see his own evil.  He understands that others see him as evil but he sees himself as maintaining order by doing what is necessary.  Vader’s desire, his only real desire, is to feed the addictive hunger inside him which the power of the dark side has created.  He serves in the hope of destroying the Emperor and stealing all of his power.  The Emperor’s central motivation is to create order, secondary to that is his desire to contain non-humans. Both characters had very distinct motivations that lead them to commit evil acts in the pursuit of achieving these goals.

If we look at a couple of the villains, from our group of writers, which I mentioned in my last post we see that Korluus’s primary motivation is self-perfection.  His pursuit of self-perfection has led him to the assumption that whatever serves this pursuit is ‘good’.  Therefore he commits horrendous acts in the name of raising humanity to perfection, himself first of course, and classifies said acts as ‘good’.  On the other hand Loki, from Erik’s fantasy writing, is pursuing Ragnarök (the end of the Norse gods).  The question we are confronted with is why? The two possible answers that I have seen so far (I know you all haven’t) are 1) that Loki desires the end, that he believes it is a good thing. Or 2) that his hate is so complete that he prefers destruction, the destruction of all things, to his own continued existence.

Ultimately there are many things that go into writing a good villain, as many as go into any other character, however there are some that are more often ignored or handled badly than others. I was intending for this to be my last post on this subject, however (in an effort to make my posts more manageable) I am going to split this in two. So, next time, On Villains Part Four: On Humanity, That Poor Little Psychopath.

****************************************************************

Among The Neshelim: My first novel, Among the Neshelim, is now available from Smashwords here, and Amazon here. Print copies are not yet available, but will be soon.

Among the Neshelim

by

Tobias Mastgrave

Understanding. One little word, and yet it means so much. We spend our lives pursuing it in one form or another. We long for it, seek it out, and break ourselves trying to find it. But it is always a rare commodity.

Chin Cao Yu, priest and scholar, has sacrificed all he held dear in its pursuit. Now he undertakes the journey of a lifetime, a journey among the mysterious Neshilim, a people of power unlike any he has seen before – all for the hope of understanding. This journey will turn upside down the world he thought he knew and challenge all of his dearly held beliefs. Has he found the ultimate truth or the ultimate lie? And what will he do with it when he learns?

On Villains Part 3: On Motivations, The Method Behind The Madness

I want to speak today on one of the most important factors of creating a believable, frightening, impactful villain: motivations.

Ok…I’m going to rant here for just a moment, it won’t be long I promise, if you’d rather get on with things just skip down to the next paragraph.  Many villains that we see in media today have no real motivations.  The deciding factor behind the majority of their actions seems to be ‘how do I PROVE that I’m evil’.  In the entirety of human history, I promise you, no more than a handful of people have gone out of their way to PROVE that they were evil…and the ones that did, NOT THE BEST VILLAINS IN HISTORY! Hitler, Mussolini, and Hirohito did not think of themselves as villains.  Nero and Caligula did not think of themselves as villains.  Real villains DON’T HAVE TO PROVE THEY ARE EVIL!!!

Anyway, short rant done now on to motivations.  Your villains should have reasons for pretty much everything they do, good reasons, believable reasons.  However the key to any character, villains included, is to define their central motivations.  What factor, or combination of factors, drives your villain to his wickedness? Does he lust after power? Does he want to become a god? Does he want to protect his people or his family? Is he running away from something in his past? Is it as simple as he just doesn’t know how to do anything else?

Let’s look at the motivations of some excellent villains. In my last post I used Star Wars as an example, I love Star Wars…to be honest I’m a little bit obsessed. Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader are two of my favorite villains, they have excellent and CLEAR motivations.  Darth Vader falls into the dark side trying to save his wife, to protect his family.  However once corrupted, once he has lost everything he loved, he continues to pursue power despite clearly seeing it’s evil.  In a poignant moment in ‘Return of the Jedi’ he responds to Luke’s pleas with the statement ‘It is too late for me son, you do not know the power of the dark side. I must obey my master.”

Darth Vader understands his own darkness, his own evil, but he sees no way out. The Emperor, on the other hand, does not see his own evil.  He understands that others see him as evil but he sees himself as maintaining order by doing what is necessary.  Vader’s desire, his only real desire, is to feed the addictive hunger inside him which the power of the dark side has created.  He serves in the hope of destroying the Emperor and stealing all of his power.  The Emperor’s central motivation is to create order, secondary to that is his desire to contain non-humans. Both characters had very distinct motivations that lead them to commit evil acts in the pursuit of achieving these goals.

If we look at a couple of the villains, from our group of writers, which I mentioned in my last post we see that Korluus’s primary motivation is self-perfection.  His pursuit of self-perfection has led him to the assumption that whatever serves this pursuit is ‘good’.  Therefore he commits horrendous acts in the name of raising humanity to perfection, himself first of course, and classifies said acts as ‘good’.  On the other hand Loki, from Erik’s fantasy writing, is pursuing Ragnarök (the end of the Norse gods).  The question we are confronted with is why? The two possible answers that I have seen so far (I know you all haven’t) are 1) that Loki desires the end, that he believes it is a good thing. Or 2) that his hate is so complete that he prefers destruction, the destruction of all things, to his own continued existence.

Ultimately there are many things that go into writing a good villain, as many as go into any other character, however there are some that are more often ignored or handled badly than others. I was intending for this to be my last post on this subject, however (in an effort to make my posts more manageable) I am going to split this in two. So, next time, On Villains Part Four: On Humanity, That Poor Little Psychopath.

****************************************************************

Among The Neshelim: My first novel, Among the Neshelim, is now available from Smashwords here, and Amazon here. Print copies are not yet available, but will be soon.

Among the Neshelim

by

Tobias Mastgrave

Understanding. One little word, and yet it means so much. We spend our lives pursuing it in one form or another. We long for it, seek it out, and break ourselves trying to find it. But it is always a rare commodity.

Chin Cao Yu, priest and scholar, has sacrificed all he held dear in its pursuit. Now he undertakes the journey of a lifetime, a journey among the mysterious Neshilim, a people of power unlike any he has seen before – all for the hope of understanding. This journey will turn upside down the world he thought he knew and challenge all of his dearly held beliefs. Has he found the ultimate truth or the ultimate lie? And what will he do with it when he learns?

On Villains Part 2: On Types, Stepping Forth Into Darkness

So, last time I talked about where a writer’s villains come from, this time I want to put a little thought into what they look like. Now what I’m going to put forth here are four general archetypes for villains, sometimes two villains of the same archetype look quite similar, other times they look very, very different. The general rules for these archetypes are these:

1. They are very broad categories and sometimes even overlap. One in fact overlaps with portions of all of the others, or all of the others overlap with that one depending on how you want to look at it. These categories are intentionally broad to cover the largest amount of villainy in the shortest amount of space.

2. They are not stereotypes and should not be used as stereotypes. Whenever you use an archetype for any character, as Erik sagely pointed out, you have to be careful not to turn it into a stereotype. Here is the difference: Wise old sage who gives what aide his knowledge allows=Archetype/Short old master who happens to be a hermit, talks funny, and trains the hero for his final showdown when he really should be taking on the villain himself=Stereotype (in this case the Yoda character).

3. These archetypes are not intended to cover the entirety of possible villains, to do so would, likely, be impossible. At the very least it would be an effort to time-consuming with to little reward for me to engage in. Now if someone out there wants to pay me about 50 grand I’ll be happy to spend the next two or three years coming up with a comprehensive list of types of villains used in literature/movies/comics/games/etc…until that happens this is what I’ve got.

So, that being said, on to the four archetypes for your devious, or not so devious villains. The four archetypes I am going to be discussing are the Sociopath, the Joker, the Power Monger, and the Hero.

Archetype 1: The Sociopath
Remember me saying that one of these was going to overlap with the rest, this is it. First of all lets define this term. Sociopathy and Psychopathy are often confused because they are very similar conditions and often presented as the same in the public media. For my purposes here realize that we are speaking of a person who has antisocial personality disorder. This person is characterized by an abnormal lack of empathy and amoral conduct. To put it simply he does not see that the mores, or laws, of society should apply to him. He feels no guilt and sees only an ephemeral difference between right and wrong. I read one study which suggested that around 20% of the American population show signs of Antisocial Personality Disorder. The same study suggested that many CEOs, Stock Brokers, Hollywood Stars, etc showed strong signs of this disorder.

I say this to disabuse you of the serial killer stereotype. The most common Sociopath archetype seen in literature, film, any type of entertainment actually, is the serial killer. Either the slow, methodical serial killer of many psychological thrillers, or the spree killer of many hour long cop shows. However this is a very limited usage of such a rich mental disorder.
The reason that the Sociopath archetype overlaps with all of the others is that most any of the others may fit the Sociopath archetype while still belonging in one of the other three categories Take Stephanie’s villainess from darklhp.blogspot.com Alicia Fenn. Alicia is a classic sociopathic villain, she has no morality whatsoever, sees it as a waste of time. She is devoid of empathy or guilt and seeks out the most practically efficient way of attaining her goal. However she also fits into the power monger archetype. She is cold, calculating, obsessively ordered in everything she does, and her only goal is to obtain power, both personal and political.

While many other villains will have sociopathic tendencies I have set this archetype on its own because it is very useful in building any type of villain. The most common pure sociopath is the serial killer. However, as I said above, this is a very limited use of the archetype.

Your sociopath might be a banker who doesn’t care who he hurts as long as he makes money, she might be a homewrecker who takes joy in breaking apart families, or perhaps he is a captain of the king’s guard who doesn’t care how order is kept, as long as it is.

While not likely the main villain of a fantasy or science fiction series any one of these might be a useful sub-villain, or perhaps they are your main villains. Realize that any character you choose has been done before, probably multiple times, the key to keeping an archetype from becoming a stereotypical cliche is personalizing the character, making him your own.

Archetype 2: The Joker
I actually named this archetype after my all-time favorite example of it. Just like the defining characteristic of the Sociopath is a certain amorality and lack of empathy, the defining characteristic of the Joker is a desire to create chaos. The Joker is the archetype most often comfortable seeing himself as evil. Why? Because it doesn’t matter, he can be good, evil, or neither, to him the chaos is the only thing that matters.

Just like the other archetypes the Joker can come in many forms. Obviously the archetype is named after the iconic Batman villain. This Joker fits into the sociopath archetype as well, he is amoral, violent, and obsessed with creating as much chaos as possible. He is also obsessed with making other people similar to him, or to put it more precisely, proving that they are already like him. We see this in his character in the comics, the cartoons, and the movies. These are the foundational aspects of the character that do not change even though everything else does. When you read through the comics you will find at least a half-dozen different origin stories for the Joker, different names, faces, attitudes, sometimes completely different personalities. This is, in my opinion, what makes him the perfect example for this archetype, everything about the character changes except for those archetypal aspects which make him the Joker.

In my own stories you have the character of Finnias Ghall. He is a Joker archetype, however he is a very different character. Where the Joker is sociopathic Finnias is self-hating. He loves chaos, he loves destruction, because he hates. He hates himself and the only thing he hates more than himself is everything else. Finnias pursues chaos and destruction because it allows him to satisfy his own insecurities and, at the same time, express his hate. It is not that he does not recognize his actions are wrong, or that he does not feel guilt, but that guilt simply fuels his self-loathing which prompts further acts of destruction. He covers this by convincing himself that he enjoys the destruction, that he feels no guilt because he is outside human laws.

Lastly lets look at Erik’s characterization of Loki. Ultimately it’s kind of a toss-up whether or not this Loki is evil. He is violent, and certainly seems to be uncaring of human life, yet at the same time he expresses remorse for his malicious trick that wound up putting a mistletoe spear through Baldur. He is working against the gods and seeking to bring about Ragnarök but we don’t know why he wants to bring about Ragnarök Chaos and destruction is his ultimate end, however his motivations are obscured. Contrast this against Batman’s Joker, whose motivations are generally told to anyone who’ll listen and who doesn’t seem to have the word ‘sorry’ in his vocabulary, and you find a very different version of this same archetype.

So, how can you use the Joker in your story, perhaps your joker is a Sociopath, perhaps he is causing chaos in an effort to achieve some greater good. Perhaps he is a powerful, but mentally deficient character who simply doesn’t know any better, or perhaps he is a childish god playing with his toys. There are a great many ways to portray the Joker archetype, both poorly and well, however these villains can be very useful in a story and are generally very fun to write.

Archetype 3: The Power Monger
Sometimes you just need an evil overlord. This is the defining characteristic of the Power Monger.

He wants, or has, power. He is in charge, the man with the plan, he can be anything from a god to a warlord to a superhero gone mad. Regardless of his details the point is he is obsessed with having, and using, power.

There are many examples of good Power Mongers, and many examples of bad. Emperor Palpatine from Star Wars, Saruman from Lord of the Rings, Darken Rahl from Terry Goodkind’s Sword of Truth series, all are examples of Power Mongers.

From our writers Brian’s character of Korluus is an excellent example of the Power Monger archetype and my own character Abin-Thul fits some aspects of it, though not perfectly. Let’s look at some of these characters for a moment. Korluus is old, for his world at least, he has been the ruler of his world for centuries. Korluus holds his power tightly, unwilling to let it go, he keeps his people drugged so they will be pliable, and indoctrinates them to his own glory. In many ways Korluus is similar to Palpatine, however Korluus does not have the smooth persona which Palpatine exhibits. They both rule by fear but in Palpatine’s empire many people genuinely love him, he makes them rich, keeps them safe. How doesn’t matter so much. Korluus, on the other hand, keeps his people under his thumb. Rebels are fewer than in Palpatine’s empire because no-one can remember how to rebel, or how to be angry with Korluus.

On the other hand Saruman, from Lord of the Rings, does not rule. He has great power but he is just beginning his conquest when we meet him. He is thousands of years old and has been ‘one of the good guys’ for most of that time. Saruman is a Power Monger that has been seduced by power, more precisely by the person of Sauron and the power of the Palantir.

Darken Rahl begins the story as a mighty king ruling two different kingdoms with an iron fist. He treats his own people poorly and the peasantry like cattle. He is charming, in person, and powerful however it is difficult to see why anyone would actually follow him because of the way he treats them. Needless to say that Rahl is not one of my favorite villains because he makes too many classic villain mistakes…for a great list of these see the Evil Overlord List. I promise it will change your life.

Anyway, on to my own character Abin-Thul. Abin-Thul is a character who doesn’t quite fit into any of these categories He is a king, and dreadfully powerful at that, but he is not obsessed with that power, nor is he under the impression that he is the most powerful being in the world (a general failing of the Power Monger is that they tend to suffer from megalomania..though not 100% of the time and you tend to get a better Power Monger if he doesn’t). Abin-Thul is a being of great power who knows exactly where he fits in the order of things, he plays his part well. He is not ambitious, nor is he intentionally cruel, however he is somewhat apathetic when it comes to his own kingdom. He allows corruption to spread through his kingdom and does nothing to hinder it because he does not care. He rules by fear, like most Power Mongers, but not fear of himself. He has convinced his people, partly through conniving and partly because it is the truth, that the world is full of wicked monsters and spirits and only his power protects them. The people do not fear Abin-Thul, though there is plenty to fear about him, but instead fear life without Abin-Thul and thus willingly submit to the rampant abuses of his chosen authorities in order to retain his protection.

How could you use a Power Monger in your story? Well, the Power Monger is usually the big bad guy in any story in which he appears. He is powerful, and generally not willing to share with anyone else, so if there are other villains they will normally be subordinate to him. Again this is where Abin-Thul falls out of the Power Monger mold, he is not the biggest baddy in his world and he knows it. Power Mongers can have many motivations though, from the good of a certain people group, to the perfection of their own beings, to proving themselves better than everyone else, to achieving some esoteric goal which no-one else really understands. The Emperor’s primary goals, for example, were to create order in the galaxy and force all aliens to submit to the human race. Saruman’s goal were so twisted by the seductions of the Palantir that they are difficult to understand at all. Korluus’s goal on the other hand is to achieve perfection and become a god. The key is to avoid stereotyping your Power Monger and, especially, to make his downfall believable. Again, read the Evil Overlord List and scoff at the incredible number of stupid, unbelievable mistakes that have brought down Power Mongers throughout the history of fiction. Then do your best to avoid them.

Archetype 4: The Hero
This last archetype is probably my favorite. It is also the most difficult for which to find examples. The Hero is a villain who is doing all the wrong things for the right reasons. He is the man who commits genocide to save the world, the man who enslaves a people to save them from a greater foe, the man starts a war to create peace. That is the defining characteristic of the Heroic villain, his motives are good. Not that he has convinced himself that they are good, they ACTUALLY are good. This is were many attempts at writing heroic villains get lost. You have to write a villain so lost that he believes he can accomplish his genuinely good motives through wicked means. You have to write good man who does horrible things and believes it necessary. Here are a few examples of the Heroic villain, and they are few.
One of my favorite heroic villains is from a Japanese Animation ‘The Record Of Lodoss War’. His name is Ashram and he is an honorable man. He is also a cold-blooded killer in search of great power. He starts a war, hunts down other good, honorable men, murders sleeping dragons (in this world dragons are holy gods…sort of), and massacres his enemies. Why does he do this? Because his people, the people he loves, are living on a hellish island and no-one is willing to make room for them to move. He wants to carve out a new kingdom for his people, he wants to protect them, to love them, to lead them, and he is willing to kill whoever he has to.

Another great heroic villain, the nameless Assassin from the movie Serenity. He kills anyone who gets in his way, plants bombs that kill innocents, murders a planetary population, and kills children. Why? To create a better world. The Assassin does not believe he is a good man, he does not believe he deserves to live in a better world, but he is willing to sacrifice himself so that others can.

Lastly I present one of my own villains, Horash. Horash, the ruler of the Neshelim, leads his entire people into darkness in order to save them. He teaches his people to treat all of the other races as live-stock, he leads them in conquest, and murders one of his best friends. Everything Horash does he does for the good of his people.

Now, the heroic villain is one of the most difficult to write into your story, you must write him as both a hero and a villain, your readers must be both attracted to him and horrified by him at the same time. I love Horash, but, in all honesty, the most successful heroic villain I have ever seen in Ashram. His personal honor exceeds some of the heroes in the story, his virtue is doubtless, and yet the savagery he employs in his dedication to carving out a new land is horrendous. He is a Heroic Villain in every sense of the term. So, I hope to see some Heroic Villains coming out here pretty soon. Remember, they have to be good guys…good guys who do horrible, horrible things.

Anyway, this is a long post I understand, but I hope that these archetypes are helpful in finding out who your villains are, why they do what they do, and how they do it. Remember that this is not a complete list, and that none of these archetypes are set in stone. Mix and match, take aspects from several or combine a few, I would love to see someone’s take on a sociopathic, heroic, power monger. Ok, well…maybe not really, but you get the picture, none of these archetypes are solid, always let your characters define themselves, if your villain doesn’t want to be a hero then don’t force him. On the other hand if he does want to be a hero then don’t try to keep him from it. Remember that your villains are just like all your other characters, if they’re going to be good you have to know them, inside and out.

***********************************

Among The Neshelim: My first novel, Among the Neshelim, is now available from Smashwords here, and Amazon here. Print copies are not yet available, but will be soon.

Among the Neshelim

by

Tobias Mastgrave

Understanding. One little word, and yet it means so much. We spend our lives pursuing it in one form or another. We long for it, seek it out, and break ourselves trying to find it. But it is always a rare commodity.

Chin Cao Yu, priest and scholar, has sacrificed all he held dear in its pursuit. Now he undertakes the journey of a lifetime, a journey among the mysterious Neshilim, a people of power unlike any he has seen before – all for the hope of understanding. This journey will turn upside down the world he thought he knew and challenge all of his dearly held beliefs. Has he found the ultimate truth or the ultimate lie? And what will he do with it when he learns?